What the Senate Should Ask Judge Gorsuch

What the Senate Should Ask Judge Gorsuch

A few good questions could rescue the Supreme Court hearings from the charade they’ve become.

Read more at Politico: What the Senate Should Ask Judge Gorsuch

When Judge Neil Gorsuch faces the Senate Judiciary Committee today, will we see a series of crisp, clear exchanges on the nature of the Constitution, the role of precedent, the limits of presidential power? Or will we see what one legal scholar called “a vapid and hollow charade, in which repetition of platitudes has replaced discussion of viewpoints and personal anecdotes have supplanted legal analysis”?

If the last 30 years are any guide, put your money on the second option.

Read more at Politico: What the Senate Should Ask Judge Gorsuch

Ever since Judge Robert Bork offered the Senate an honest account of his judicial philosophy in 1987 and watched it torpedo his chances, nominees have steadfastly refused to engage on controversial legal issues—insisting that they must avoid prejudging cases by remaining silent about any significant issue that might conceivably come before the court. Those nominees include Elena Kagan, the legal scholar who authored that 1995 jab at the process, and who notably lost her enthusiasm for revealing questions and answers when she was the one being questioned as a nominee.

Read more at Politico: What the Senate Should Ask Judge Gorsuch

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